It’s Everyone’s Problem

It’s been an awful week in Quebec. On Sunday, a man opened fire in a Ste-Foy mosque on attendants as they were praying, killing six men. Alexandre Bissonnette has been charged with six counts of first degree murder and faces possible terrorism charges. The victims were Azzedine Soufiane, Mamadou Tanou Barry, Khaled Belkacemi, Aboubaker Thabti, Ibrahima Barry, and Abdelkrim Hassane.

In the flood of think pieces that come out after an event like this, there was some attempt to frame this as something unique to Quebec, that somehow this province is more prone to violent outbursts than others. This bizarre piece from the Washington Post by J.J. McCullough cherry picks some events to suggest Quebec is somehow more prone to gun massacres than other provinces. Others have suggested there is more bigotry toward Muslims from white, francophone Quebeckers than other Canadians.

Certainly, the accused is reported to have extreme views on Muslims and is a fan of Donald Trump and Marine le Pen and their views on Islam are well documented. And, indeed over the past number of years in Quebec politics, there have been a number of proposals put forward by politicians that views as targeting the Muslim community. The views heard on Quebec’s talk radio stations, radio poubelle, as it’s known, are often extreme and derogatory toward Muslims.

But I would say it’s a mistake to lead people to believe Quebec is somehow more than Islamophobic than anywhere else in the world. I think Islamophobia is generally a Western problem. In Canada, the far-right news website Rebel Media spent the week trying to prove the attack was done by Muslims. (I won’t link to that site but instead you can read the Beaverton’s take on it here). In Europe, far-right, anti-immigration parties are making gains partially based on a fear of Muslims. So this is by no means unique to Quebec.

I don’t know if this event will make people behave a little more decently to each other and stop fearing the “otherness” of them but it was gratifying to see so many people coming out to vigils and the funerals of the victims. If nothing else, people should know that those who hold such extreme views represent a only fringe minority of the population.

For my part, I donated to a fund for the victims’ families here.

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