Here’s Another Thing We’re Doing Wrong

According to this article, starting infants on solids before six months of age increases the risk of obesity. So let’s add that to the grand list of Things We’re Doing Wrong:

  • Started solids at five months
  • Formula-fed
  • Slept in his own room early on
  • Cried it out
  • Disposable diapers
  • Non-organic pesticide-filled food
  • Watches TV (had identified Moe from the Doodlebops as his favourite character)

Parents are also not entirely slim (although his mum has gone all fit n’ foxy at forty due to the weight she’s lost, which I, in turn, found). Add that to a pending move to NB, one of the Canada’s heavier provinces, and he just really doesn’t stand a chance.

Odd that, knock on wood, he hasn’t had much more than the odd cold.

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11 thoughts on “Here’s Another Thing We’re Doing Wrong

  1. Us:
    * Started solids at five months
    * Breast-fed (still is)
    * Slept in his own room only recently
    * Has never cried it out
    * Disposable diapers at night (7th generation), Cotton during the day
    * Organic milk, organic food if we have it, otherwise not. He’s in love with cheese curds, cheerios and blueberries. Makes for interesting diaper changes.
    * Watches TV (thank gawd for Treehouse)

    You know what? He didn’t walk until he was 18 months old. We were told it’s because we have a dog & cat, so he emulated the walking on 4 legs (yeah, I don’t get it either).
    He still doesn’t talk (we’ve been told it’s because I speak French to him, his mother speaks English, and he hears Spanish at the day are).
    He doesn’t sleep through the night.
    Oh, and he gets really sick about once per month, most likely due to whatever’s going around at the day care.

    Damn it, why can’t kids all be exactly the same?!?
    And, um, yeah, had to join a gym to work off the post-natal gut.

  2. But he’s so cute. You must’ve done something right.

    Also: in NB he’ll stand out because you guys are twice the age of most parents. ZING, Saint John!

    • I, uh, am teaching the kid of a girl I went to elementary school with. I am thirty-four, and I teach at a high school. It’s not that it’s not possible, it’s just…

      Oh, Saint John.

  3. Yeah, sex ed is gonna be a big thing in our house.

    Of course, it would help if the government gave women, um, options when they, um, require them. Might help with that whole ‘highest rate of teen pregnancy in Canada’ statistic. Just sayin’.

  4. After being bombarded by the in-laws with condescending comments about how we’re not doing things right, we’ve just gone with what feels right and what we can reasonably accomplish. Though their list for kids include being inundated by Princess/Barbie plastic items (girls only get girl toys) and your child is a mutant if they haven’t walked by one year or talked by 18 months. I understand the concern for some things, but I just don’t like the tone.

    • We’re pretty fortunate that, most of the time, we don’t get a lot of comments from family but then, that could be because we don’t have any in the city. I imagine when we move back to Saint John, we’ll be closer to my two sisters who’ve never had an issue criticizing any of my choices in life.

      I think in my case, I have a general idealized image of what “perfect parents” are and it tends to involve organic eating, a jogging stroller, and enrollment at a Waldorf/Montessori daycare. We, of course, do none of these things.

      The most important thing is the parents’ intentions and a lot of one-on-one time with the kids when you’re directly interacting and communicating with them. I think if you’ve got that down, everything else falls in place. The stuff you buy is just that: stuff.

      Also, tell your in-laws all children walk and talk at different stages so they can shove it. 😉

  5. Just keep watching Mad Men and you’ll feel better. I’d have lots of children if it was still ok to have a full time underpaid nanny and if I could talk to the kids just like Betty Draper: “Go to your room!”

    • I think my childhood was much like that of the Draper children, come to think of it. Except without the stolen identity, the heaps of money, the affairs (or so I believe), the nanny, and the Coupe de Ville.

      I feel bad if I so much as stay an hour late at the office, never mind disappearing in California for weeks at time.

  6. Pingback: Or Maybe We’re Doing Some Things Right « Shatnerian

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